The five-hour motorcycle ride - Hue to De Nang, Vietnam
ohhhhh Bali!

Vietnam: Hoi An, Hue, and Hanoi

 

 

May/June 2013


Where do I begin.... with our buffalo ride? 


 

Hoi An 1

 

 

Or the motorcycle ride?

 

 

Hue 14


The people?

 

 

Hanoi 2

 

 

Hue 2

 

 

The temples?

 

 

Hue 29

 

The beach?

 

 

Baby on the beach

 

 

Or the beautiful scenery?

 


Hue 16


This was a real vacation... meaning D did not have to work!  We started in the ancient town of Hoi An, 30 km south of Da Nang, one of the major trading centers of Southeast Asia in the 16th century.  Many of the old houses in Hoi An reflect a blend of both Chinese and Japanese architecture.  Today they are known for their silk lanterns and...

 

Hoi An 13

 

the Japanese bridge, said to be one of the most famous bridges in Vietnam.   It was constructed in the early 1600s, to connect the Japanese community with the Chinese quarter.  Today the old town of Hoi An is a UNESCO World heritage Site.

 

Hoi An 12

Our hotel was a few miles away from the main part of town, in a rice field.  We loved it!  This is where we got to ride the  water buffalo.  I have now ridden an elephant, a camel, and a  water buffalo.  What next?    

 

  Hoi An 2

 

What we liked about our hotel was just a few steps out the door we were able to see the daily life of the local community.  We were there at the end of a rice harvest and the fields had just been cut.  The farmers were preparing the land for the next crop.  They can get three crops in per year.  This farmer was using his buffalo to till the land.  Funny how he holds the tail.

 

Hoi An 5

 

 

  Hoi An 6

 

 

This one will go into my "Haystacks Around the World" book!

 

 

Hoi An 9

 

And you think walking the dog each morning is a chore!

 

 

Hoi An 8

 

 

Hoi An 7

 

Planting seed for the next crop.


 

Hoi An 3

 

 

Grocery shopping at the duck farm.

 

 

  Hoi An 4

 

With free delivery!

 

  Duck

 

I have to show you the bathtub/shower in our hotel room, it was completely outside!  It was very relaxing to take a bath at night, under the full moon.

 

  Hoi An 11

 

 

The Full Moon Lantern Festival

 

We timed this trip so we would be there for the full moon lantern festival.

 

 

Hoi An 14

 

On the 14th day of every lunar month, the old town of Hoi An celebrates the Full Moon Lantern Festival.  They streets are closed to cars and motorcycles.  Street lights are off as well as the front lights of the shops.  People bring out candles and lanterns to light up the streets.  It is magical.

 

  Hoi An 15

 

For the locals the night of the full moon is the time to honor their ancestors by setting up altars and offering fruit, flowers, candles and incense to the deceased.  

 

Hoi An 16

 

 

I thought this was a big event for tourists, but the Vietnamese are the main participants.  They come from miles around to join in the festivities.  The streets were insane!  I do no know where all the people came from.  At 6:00 we were pretty much the only ones on the street.  By nightfall, you could barely walk on the street, it was so crowded.

 

 

  Hoi An 17

 

Locals were everywhere selling cardboard lotus-flower-shaped lanterns, with tiny candles.  They had the young children approach us with their “cute face” to encourage us to buy from them.  It worked…

 

Hoi An 19

 

Once purchased, you release your candle into the river to bring happiness, luck, and love.

 

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It was quite beautiful to see all the lanterns floating in the river.

 

 

Hoi An 20

 

The next morning we signed up for a sunrise photography tour to a nearby fishing village.  It was well worth the time and money. 

 

Vietnam (1)

 

We were picked up at our hotel at 4:55 am!

 

 

Hoi An 24

 

It is a busy fishing port.  The ladies are waiting for the daily catch to come in.

 

 

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They purchase the fish from the fishermen, clean them, and turn right around and sell them to people on the shore.

 

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Hoi An 25

 

 

Hoi An 28

 

 

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They are weighing the fish and negotiating a price.

 

 

Hoi An 27

 

 The fish look really good.

 

 

Hoi An 22

 

Look  how beautifully the fish are laid out in the basket.

 

 

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Counting the profit from the day's catch, and using the special "toe bank."

 

 

Hoi An 29

 

They look pretty happy.  Must be a good day for fishing.

 

 

Hoi An 32

 

 

The people of the fishing village


 

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Just a few feet from where all the fish action takes place, there are a few restaurants and shops.  The people were very friendly and open to us taking their photos. 

 

 

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I chatted with these two ladies via our photographer-guide.  They wanted to know how old I was.  This is the number one question Asians ask.  We don't think they really care, it is just a line of Englsih they learn first.  They are also intrigued with our "white" skin and usually want to know where we are from.  I always say Singapore, which produces a puzzled look on their face and they usually say "you are not from Singapore!"

 

 

Hoi An 36

 

 

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The fitting...

Hoi An is famous for their tailors and custom-made clothes, shoes, and leather goods.  I have never seen so many tailors in one small town.  Donald has a tailor he really likes in Bangkok, so he was not interested.  I have never had custom clothes made so I gave it a try.

 

 

Hoi An 47

 

I bought two dress, two pairs of pants, and the polka-dot top below.  We got the dress and the pants to fit, but were running out of time to get the top right, so she put me on the back of her motorcycle and took me to the seamstress - her cousin.

 

 

Hoi An 48

 

 

That ride changed the rest of our vacation... (in a good way)!

 

 

Hoi An 49

 

Next stop Hue

We took a three-hour train ride from Hoi An to Hue.  When we arrived, I told the hubby I had read that the best way to see Hue and all the temples was via motorcycle tour.  I asked, "Would you want to do this?"  With big eyes he says - are you kidding me - I would LOVE this.  So a quick email and we had a guide for the next day.  He claims it was my ride with the tailor that changed me.

 

 

Hue 10

 

 

Our guides, Tim and Heui with Hue Adventures, were right on time to meet us at our hotel.  We selected them because they are #1 on Trip Adviser for motorcycle tours.  Poor Tim, when we first started I had my arms around his waist and squeezed him every time I was scared... which was all the time for the first 15 min.  And as you can see he is half the size of me!


 

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Love this photo - look how happy D is, and how focused Heui is.

 

 

  Hue 15

 

We were in city traffic for a short time.

 

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Then went off the beaten path through jungle like areas to visit temples.  I liked this better than the crazy city.  

 

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Vietnam is a beautiful country.  Officially the Socialist Republic of Vietnam, it is the easternmost country on the Indochina Peninsula in Southeast Asia.

 

 

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There are hundreds of old pagodas in Hue; Tu Hieu is one of the most famous.   The pagoda was originally a small hut built in 1843.  In 1848, the pagoda was restored and become a burial site.


 

Temple

 

 

Built in 1601, the Thien Mu Pagoda is the tallest in Vietnam.   

 

 

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 Acres and acres of rice fields. 

 

 

Hue 8

 

The Thanh Toan Bridge just outside of Hue is a beautiful old tiled bridge built in 1776 by a lady of the village who married a wealthy man.  She desperately wanted a son and as part of her prayers she built the bridge to help her neighbors.  So the story goes…

 

 

Hue 5

 

 

The famous Mother Dieu, known as the “Love fortune-teller” sits inside the old bridge and will tell you a fortune for a small price.  But... she will only tell foreigners their fortune.

 

 

Hue 6

 

This is my reaction when she told me D had a 17-year-old son - this was after she asked me if I had any children and I told her no!  She also told me I get mad at him because he works too much (laughing).

 

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This is the view coming back into the old section of Hue.  The lotus lights were put up that week to honor Buddha's Birthday.  They were even prettier at night.

 

 

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The next day we visited Hue Imperial City (The Citadel).

 

 Hue 28

 

 

The Citadel was constructed in 1805 under the Nguyen Dynasty.  Between 1802 and 1945, it was the imperial capital of the Nguyen dynasty and served as the house of the government.  

 

 

Hue 22

 

The Citadel takes up a large part of the city.  It is walled-in on the north side of the Perfume River.  In ancient times, the inside of the citadel was a forbidden city where only the emperors, concubines, and those close to them could enter; the punishment for trespassing was death.  

 

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This colorful flower, which resembled an orchid, was in bloom all over the city.  It is called a Flame Tree.



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One of the guard's gates to the Imperial City.

 

 

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The Journey back from Hue to De Nang... via motorcycle!!

I let D talk me into bagging the train ride back and taking a 5-hour motorcycle ride.  He whined... "it is the same route they took on Top Gear!"  Click here to read all about this adventure - it warranted a post all on its own!

 

 

D on bike

 

 

We stayed one night in Da Nang.  It is about 45 minutes from Hoi An, but closer to the airport.  With an early morning flight to Hanoi, we though this would be easier.  Plus, De Nang is known for its beaches, with the most famous being China Beach (where thousands of American G.I.s spent their leave surfing and sunning during the Vietnam War).

The neighborhood was local, non-touristy; so we had fun exploring that afternoon.  There was an evening market going on.  I LOVE this photo - look closely, the woman is giving her friend a pedicure while selling fish.  OH MY!

 

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She must have negotiated a good price, as she is really happy.

 

 

Hoi An 54

 

Many of the grandparents asked us to take photos of the children.  This guy looks like he is eating well.  He is almost as big as his grandfather!

 

 

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Beautiful big eyes!

 

 

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Just a gas pump, but you have to admit it is interesting!

 

 

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When we first arrived at the beach it was pretty quiet.

 

 

Boys with boat

 

But VERY quickly it became insane.  And this was at 5:30 at night.  What we learned is, the Vietnamese never go to the beach during the day, too much sun.  Instead, they go in the evening and take dinner.  They had all kinds of food cooking on the beach.  Surprisingly very little was for sale.

 

  Hoi An 50

 

 

They all seemed to cluster into one area on the beach.  If you looked in the other direction, hardly anyone was there.  It was also interesting to note that most of the women went swimming with clothes on, not bathing suits.

 

 

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There were also fishermen packing up their boat.

 

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Hanoi

 

Our last stop was Hanoi and it was all about shopping, food, and coffee.  Since we visited last year we did not take as many photos as usual, click here to read more about our earlier trip to Hanoi,

 

Hanoi 10

 

Have you ever tasted egg coffee?  Click here to read more about this delicious drink... heaven in a glass!


 

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The kitchen of the restaurant where we ate twice.  Between eating here and the motorcycle ride... I must be getting crazy in my old age!

 

 

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And the dishwasher.  Sure, those dishes are clean.  I've mentioned it before, because we have iron Asia tummies, we never get sick (knock on wood).

 

 

Hanoi 6

 

Loved this dish of beef and greens - isn't it pretty?

 

Hanoi 9

 

Pigeon.  They probably caught it around the corner  :  )

You would pay top dollar for pigeon in a French restaurant!

 

 

Hanoi 8

 

Someone is enjoying his meal.  Total cost for dinner with beer - $7.00 usd.

 

 

Hanoi 5

 

 

D food

This is my favorite Vietnamese dish, bun thit nuong.  My mom and I get this very dish in the Vietnamese restaurant near her house - she loves it.  Pretty sure she would not eat at the restaurant where we had this one.

 

Hanoi 1

 

This man was interesting.  He asked if he could sit with us - all with hand-language, as he did not speak ONE WORD of English.  He talked to us for 30 minutes IN Vietnamese.

 

  Hanoi 3

 

He was very intrigued with D's age spots.  Pointing to them and touching his skin, then touching his own arm.  He was also interested in my nose.  He would point to my nose then push on his.  We are pretty sure he was telling me I had a big honker!  The whole thing was bizarre.

 

Hanoi 4

 

 We had an absolute BLAST in Vietnam!!  And if the 100 plus photos I shared aren't enough, I have a slide show with the extra ones!  Enjoy.

 

 

  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 



Comments

donna

What an amazing trip! I never knew that Viet Nam was so gorgeous! Your photos are just stunning, and really capture the essence of the people and culture! You are so lucky to have to many wonderful adventures, I don't think my stomach would hold up as good as yours, especially after seeing those kitchens and the dishes being washed:)

Seth

These photos are spectacular. What an amazing adventure. Thank you for showing us this fascinating culture through your eyes.

Carol aka Traveller

I want to visit Vietnam too! Love your photos, as always

Kathy

Amazing, as always. I always learn so many interesting facts from you and love your sense of adventure!! I am curious, why are some people wearing masks and not others?
I am off now to read about the motorcycle trip!

Gerda Pretorius

Beautiful photographs - must have been quite a job choosing only a 100. The lantern festival looks special. Eek, that kitchen in Hanoi! Here in Baotou most restaurants place all their dirty dishes in large containers which get taken away to wash, and clean ones shrink wrapped in a set (cup, bowl, plate, spoon) returned to the shop.

Phong Nguyen

Lovely post, Cathy. On why the ladies do not wear swimsuits, it's because white skin is preferred than tanned skin in Vietnam. Besides, were the fortune teller correct? I'm surprised that they do fortune telling for foreigners nowadays.

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